MiR-92b and miR-9/9* are specifically expressed in brain primary tumors and can be used to differentiate primary from metastatic brain tumors

Dvora Nass, Shai Rosenwald, Eti Meiri, Shlomit Gilad, Hilla Tabibian-Keissar, Anat Schlosberg, Hagit Kuker, Netta Sion-Vardy, Ana Tobar, Oleg Kharenko, Einat Sitbon, Gila Lithwick Yanai, Eran Elyakim, Hila Cholakh, Hadas Gibori, Yael Spector, Zvi Bentwich, Iris Barshack, Nitzan Rosenfeld*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A recurring challenge for brain pathologists is to diagnose whether a brain malignancy is a primary tumor or a metastasis from some other tissue. The accurate diagnosis of brain malignancies is essential for selection of proper treatment. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNA species that regulate gene expression; many exhibit tissue-specific expression and are misregulated in cancer. Using microRNA expression profiling, we found that hsa-miR-92b and hsa-miR-9/hsa-miR-9* are over-expressed, specifically in brain primary tumors, as compared to primary tumors from other tissues and their metastases to the brain. By considering the expression of only these two microRNAs, it is possible to distinguish between primary and metastatic brain tumors with very high accuracy. These microRNAs thus represent excellent biomarkers for brain primary tumors. Previous reports have found that hsa-miR-92b and hsa-miR-9/hsa-miR-9* are expressed more strongly in developing neurons and brain than in adult brain. Thus, their specific over-expression in brain primary tumors supports a functional role for these microRNAs or a link between neuronal stem cells and brain tumorigenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-383
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Pathology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009

Keywords

  • MicroRNA expression
  • Molecular diagnostics
  • Tumor classification

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