Mental Distress, Well-Being, and Stress-Related Growth following an Anti-LGBQ Hate Crime among LGBQ Young Adults in Israel: The Effect of Familiarity with the Victims and the Mediating Role of Emotional Support

Nadav Antebi-Gruszka, Zohar Mor, Guy Shilo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using data from 696 Israeli LGBQ individuals aged 13–30, this study explored the negative (mental distress) and positive changes (well-being and stress-related growth) following the deadliest anti-LGBQ hate crime in Israel to date (the Bar-Noar Massacre), while examining differences in these outcomes between those who did and did not know hate crime victims. Furthermore, the mediating role of emotional support in facilitating better mental health and stress-related growth was tested. Results suggested that compared to those who did not know any victims, those who personally knew the victims sought emotional support from more sources, had higher scores of mental distress, but also of well-being and stress-related growth. Emotional support indeed mediated the relationship between familiarity with hate crime victims and better mental health and higher levels of growth. Increasing access to emotional support may be particularly helpful in addressing the needs of LGBQ young adults following an anti-LGBQ hate crime.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Hate crime
  • LGBQ
  • emotional support
  • mental distress
  • stress-related growth
  • well-being
  • young adults

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