Mediating effects of perceived personal control in coping with a health threat: The case of genetic counseling

Shoshana Shiloh, Michal Berkenstadt, Nachshon Meiran, Mariassa Bat-Miriam-Katznelson, Boleslav Goldman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The potential impact of perceived personal control on coping with a medical threat was investigated in genetic counseling, a clinical setting where issues of personal control are central. Data were collected from 72 counselees at a genetic clinic before, immediately after, and 1 month after initiating genetic counseling. Findings supported the hypothesized mediating model. Higher perceived control (cognitive-interpretive and decisional) and satisfaction with genetic counseling mediated between genetic counseling and the use of less emotion-focused coping strategies. Problem-focused coping was predicted only directly by counselees' knowledge of their problem after genetic counseling. Changes in emotion-focused coping were related to perceived increases in positive affect 1 month later, while changes in use of problem-focused coping were related to perceived decreases in both positive and negative affect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1146-1174
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume27
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1997

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