Maternal positive skin prick test results and asthma prediction after early childhood wheezing

Arnon Elizur*, Noam Pollack, Sarah E. Boslaugh, Yakar Kannai, Yitzhak Katz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have used parental history of asthma or allergy but not positive skin prick test results to predict the evolution of asthma in wheezing infants. Objective: To determine whether positive parental skin prick test results serve as a predictive factor for the subsequent development of asthma in a child with a history of wheezing before the age of 3 years. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study we investigated 91 individuals from 71 families. Enrollment criteria were age 6 to 40 years, history of wheezing before the age of 3 years, and no chronic lung disease other than asthma. Each participant was asked about current asthma-related symptoms, underwent pulmonary function testing, and underwent skin prick testing. Participants' parents underwent skin prick testing and measurement of total serum IgE levels. Results: Asthma was diagnosed in 56 participants (61%). Although maternal positive skin prick test results conferred a 3.4-fold risk of asthma (P = .02), neither the mother's nor the father's self-reported allergy or asthma was predictive of later development of asthma. Conclusion: The presence of parental, and especially maternal, positive skin prick test results is a significant predictive factor for the subsequent development of asthma in early childhood wheezing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)540-545
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2007
Externally publishedYes

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