Mass at the splenic hilum: A clue to torsion of a wandering spleen located in a normal left upper quadrant position

Ada Kessler*, Elka Miller, Sergei Keidar, Arye Blachar, Liat Ben Sira, Mark Weinberg, Avinoam Rachmel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Wandering spleen is an extremely rare condition in which the spleen is lacking its normal ligamentous attachments and therefore can move to an ectopic position in the abdomen or pelvis. Wandering spleen predisposes the patient to life-threatening complications due to torsion of the spleen's vascular pedicle, with resulting splenic infarction, portal hypertension, and bleeding.1 Because of the nonspecific symptoms, imaging plays an important role. To our knowledge, only a few case reports describing wandering spleen in the pediatric population have been published,1-4 including 2 cases in infancy.5,6 We report a case of splenic torsion in an infant with a preoperative diagnosis made on the basis of color and power Doppler sonography. The diagnosis was confirmed by contrast-enhanced helical computed tomography (CT) and proved at surgery. On sonography, a diffusely hypoechoic spleen and a mass at the splenic hilum representing the torsed splenic pedicle were shown. The splenic hilar mass correlates with the CT "whirl" sign indicative of torsion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)527-530
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Ultrasound in Medicine
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2003
Externally publishedYes

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