Margins of partial cricotracheal resection in children

David L. Walner, Yoram Stern, Robin T. Cotton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To review the surgical margins of partial cricotracheal resection in our series of patients. This includes specific anatomic detail as to each superior and inferior resection margin. To apply this information and access the utility of partial cricotracheal resection for the treatment of subglottic stenosis. Study Design/Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 38 children with severe subglottic stenosis who underwent partial cricotracheal resection. Information was obtained with regard to the specific anatomic location of the superior and inferior resection margins, the grade of subglottic stenosis preoperatively, the type of stenting material used postoperatively, and other surgical details specific to each procedure. Results: The superior resection margins were generally to the superior aspect of the cricoid cartilage but as high as the undersurface of the true vocal folds in a minority of patients. Inferior resection margins were generally to the second tracheal ring. Length of resection varied, but was as long as 3.0 cm in one patient. Overall surgical success based on decannulation was > 86% Conclusion: Partial cricotracheal resection is a safe and successful procedure for the treatment of subglottic stenosis. The margins and length of resection should be tailored specifically for each patient; and special considerations must be taken when extensive resection to the level of the true vocal folds is required. Safe airway management in the postoperative period is essential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1607-1610
Number of pages4
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume109
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Laryngotracheal reconstruction
  • Laryngotracheal stenosis
  • Partial cricotracheal resection
  • Subglottic stenosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Margins of partial cricotracheal resection in children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this