Maladjustment implications of self and group gender-role discrepancies: An ordered-discrepancy model

Christopher T. Burris, Nyla R. Branscombe, Yechiel Klar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Deviation from personal ideals and group standards has maladaptive consequences. Using insights from self-categorization and social identity theories, an ordered-discrepancy model of maladjustment was proposed in which simultaneously deviating from both types of standards is associated with increased maladjustment for members of high status groups, except when such dual discrepancies imply that one is closer to one's ideals than is one's group. In the latter case, decreased maladjustment can be expected. For members of low status groups, discrepancies from ideals, but not from one's group, were expected to predict maladjustment. Patterns of deviations on dimensions of masculinity and femininity predicted maladjustment among men, a high status group, and women, a low status group, as hypothesized. Implications for social identity and self-categorization theories, and for gender-role research, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-95
Number of pages21
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

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