Low-dose thalidomide and donor lymphocyte infusion as adoptive immunotherapy after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma

Nicolaus Kröger*, Avichai Shimoni, Maria Zagrivnaja, Francis Ayuk, Michael Lioznov, Heike Schieder, Helmut Renges, Boris Fehse, Tatjana Zabelina, Arnon Nagler, Axel R. Zander

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To improve the antimyeloma effect of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma, we investigated in a phase 1/2 study the effect of low-dose thalidomide (100 mg) followed by DLI in 18 patients with progressive disease or residual disease and prior ineffective DLI after allografting. The overall response rate was 67%, including 22% complete remission. Major toxicity of thalidomide was weakness grade I/II (68%) and peripheral neuropathy grade I/II (28%). Only 2 patients experienced mild grade I acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) of the skin, while no grades II to IV aGvHD was seen. De novo limited chronic GvMD (cGvMD) was seen in 2 patients (11%). The 2-year estimated overall and progression-free survival were 100% and 84%, respectively. Adoptive immunotherapy with low-dose thalidomide and DLI induces a strong antimyeloma effect with low incidence of graft versus host disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3361-3363
Number of pages3
JournalBlood
Volume104
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Nov 2004

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