Low ALT activity amongst patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards is a widespread phenomenon associated with low vitamin B6 levels in their blood

Erez Ramati, Ariel Israel, Kessler Tal Kessler, Naama Petz-Sinuani, Ben Ami Sela, Goren Idan Goren, Atar Grinfeld, Bruno Lavi, Gad Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Monitoring the activity of ALT (SGPT) in the blood is part of the routine, clinical-laboratory follow-up in hospitalized patients. In most cases, activity levels which are above the normal range are considered pathology, mostly related to lysis of hepatocytes, as in cases of hepatitis. Little has been investigated and published in regard to cases in which the ALT activity level is lower than normal.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Since normal ALT activity is regarded essential for normal metabolism and homeostasis, we decided to evaluate the extent to which low ALT levels are found in healthy and hospitalized patient populations and to characterize its circumstances and etiology. Furthermore, we measured the blood concentration of vitamin B6 (being the source for the ALT co-factor, Pyridoxal-5-Phosphate) in a random sample of patients with lower than normal ALT activity level.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study showed a high prevalence, exceeding a third of hospitalized patients in internal medicine departments have low levels of ALT in the serum, and that a linear correlation (p = 0.0004, r = 0.47) exists between lower than normal ALT activity and low concentrations of vitamin B6 in the serum. The authors attribute these findings to a high prevalence of frailty amongst hospitalized patients. We aim to conduct further investigations intended to better characterize quantifiable parameters of frailty amongst our patient population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-93, 137
JournalHarefuah
Volume154
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2015

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