Longing for a Longitudinal Proxy_ Acutely Measured Surface EMG Amplitude is not a Validated Predictor of Muscle Hypertrophy

Andrew D. Vigotsky*, Israel Halperin, Gabriel S. Trajano, Taian M. Vieira

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Surface electromyography amplitudes are commonly measured in acute sports and exercise science studies to make inferences about muscular strength, performance, and hypertrophic adaptations that may result from different exercises or exercise-related variables. Here, we discuss the presumptive logic and assumptions underlying these inferences, focusing on hypertrophic adaptations for simplicity’s sake. We present counter-evidence for each of its premises and discuss evidence both for and against the logical conclusion. Given the limited evidence validating the amplitude of surface electromyograms as a predictor of longitudinal hypertrophic adaptations, coupled with its weak mechanistic foundation, we suggest that acute comparative studies that wish to assess stimulus potency be met with scrutiny.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-199
Number of pages7
JournalSports Medicine
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Science FoundationDGE-1324585
Center for Selective C-H Functionalization, National Science Foundation
Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing, National Science Foundation

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Longing for a Longitudinal Proxy_ Acutely Measured Surface EMG Amplitude is not a Validated Predictor of Muscle Hypertrophy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this