Long-term outcomes of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor treatment in peripapillary choroidal neovascularisation due to age-related macular degeneration

Nir Stanescu, Asaf Friehmann, Achia Nemet, Yariv Keshet, Avi Ohayon, Eran Greenbaum, Gilad Rabina, Arie Y. Nemet, Noa Geffen, Ori Segal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To report the long-term outcomes of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment in eyes with peripapillary choroidal neovascularisation (PPCNV) associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods: A retrospective cohort study included patients with AMD-related PPCNV. Eyes were treated with anti-VEGF according to pro re nata regimen. Inactivation index was calculated as the proportion of disease inactivity from the total follow up time. Results: Sixty-seven eyes of 66 consecutive patients were included in the study; mean follow-up time was 53.2 months. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) remained stable for the first four years of follow up, with a significant deterioration in BCVA thereafter. Baseline BCVA was a significant predictor of final BCVA (p < 0.001). The mean inactivation index was 0.38 ± 0.23. Subretinal fluid (SRF) at presentation was significantly associated with decreased inactivation index (p < 0.05). Worse baseline BCVA, SRF and pigment epithelium detachment (PED), male sex, and younger patient age were associated with increased risk for recurrence after first inactivation (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The use of anti-VEGF agents in the treatment of AMD-related PPCNV managed to preserve BCVA in the first four years of follow-up. Male sex, SRF and PED at presentation and baseline BCVA are associated with increased risk for PPCNV recurrence after the first inactivation, and should prompt careful follow-up in these patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEye
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

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