Lenticulostriated vasculopathy is a high-risk marker for hearing loss in congenital cytomegalovirus infections

Efraim Bilavsky, Michael Schwarz, Joseph Pardo, Joseph Attias, Itzhak Levy, Yishai Haimi-Cohen, Jacob Amir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim This study investigated the relationship between lenticulostriated vasculopathy (LSV) and hearing loss in 141 infants with congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection. Methods We included all infants with cCMV infection who were followed in our clinic for more than a year with only LSV signs of brain involvement on initial brain ultrasound. Group one comprised 13 infants with no hearing impairment at birth who were not treated with gan/valganciclovir during 2006-2009. Group two was 51 infants with LSV and no hearing impairment who had been treated since mid-2009. Group three was 25 infants born with LSV and hearing loss, who had been treated from birth. Group four was 52 control infants born during the same period with asymptomatic cCMV. Hearing tests were performed during the neonatal period and every four to six months until four years of age. Results Hearing deterioration was more extensive in group one (85%) than in group two (0%, p < 0.001) and the asymptomatic group (10%, p < 0.001) and occurred more often in group four (10%) than in group two (0%, p = 0.008). Conclusion Lenticulostriated vasculopathy was common in infants with cCMV infection and may serve as a sign of central nervous system involvement and further hearing deterioration. Antiviral treatment may be prudent in such infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e388-e394
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume104
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Congenital infection
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Hearing loss
  • Lenticulostriated vasculopathy

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