Learning by Modeling (LbM) - The contribution of computer modeling to student's evolving understanding of complexity

Kamel Hashem, David Mioduser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

The ideas of complexity are increasingly becoming an integral part in understanding natural and social sciences. Previous research indicates that involvement with modeling scientific phenomena and complex systems can play a powerful role in science learning. Some researchers argue with this view indicating that models and modeling do not contribute to understanding complexity concepts, since these increase the cognitive load on students. This study will investigate the effect of different modes of involvement in exploring scientific phenomena using computer modeling tools, on students' understanding of complexity concepts. Quantitative and qualitative methods are used to report about 121 freshmen students that engaged in participatory simulations about complex phenomena, showing emergent, self organized and decentralized patterns. Results show that Learning-by Modeling (LbM) plays a major role in students' concept formation about complexity concepts.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICETC 2010 - 2010 2nd International Conference on Education Technology and Computer
PagesV2215-V2218
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Event2010 2nd International Conference on Education Technology and Computer, ICETC 2010 - Shanghai, China
Duration: 22 Jun 201024 Jun 2010

Publication series

NameICETC 2010 - 2010 2nd International Conference on Education Technology and Computer
Volume2

Conference

Conference2010 2nd International Conference on Education Technology and Computer, ICETC 2010
Country/TerritoryChina
CityShanghai
Period22/06/1024/06/10

Keywords

  • Complex systems
  • Complexity concepts
  • Learning by Modeling
  • Mental models

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