Learning About the Israeli–Palestinian Conflict Through Computerized Simulations: The Case of Global Conflicts

Ronit Kampf, Nathan Stolero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigates the learning outcomes of a computer game, called Global Conflicts, simulating the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. The research compares learning outcomes of Israeli–Jewish, Palestinian, Turkish, and American undergraduate students, differentiating between direct and third parties to the conflict. Learning is measured by (1) knowledge acquisition about the conflict and (2) attitude change regarding the conflict. Findings show that participants acquired knowledge about the conflict after playing the game. The game minimized the knowledge gap between third parties to the conflict (Americans and Turks) but not between direct parties to the conflict. In addition, direct parties to the conflict did not change their attitudes toward the conflict and the Gaza operation of 2012, while the attitudes of third parties became more balanced. This study has implications for the scholarship on pedagogy and teaching assessment in the context of peacebuilding. It is part of a series of studies analyzing the effects of computerized simulations on peacebuilding, and further research is necessary to understand under what conditions technology can be used as an effective peacebuilding intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-134
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Science Computer Review
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Gaza operation
  • Israeli–Palestinian conflict
  • games for change
  • knowledge gap
  • serious games

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