Late signs and symptoms of maxillary sinusitis after sinus augmentation

Yifat Manor*, Ofer Mardinger, Ilan Bietlitum, Aysar Nashef, Joseph Nissan, Gavriel Chaushu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of late signs and symptoms of acute and chronic maxillary sinusitis after sinus augmentation and to correlate them with predisposing factors. Study design: A total of 137 individuals (54 male and 83 female; 153 sinus augmentation procedures) were evaluated retrospectively for signs and symptoms of maxillary sinusitis, 12-80 months after surgery, using a questionnaire and clinical and radiographic examinations. Results: The incidence of acute and chronic sinusitis after sinus augmentation was low (<5%). History of preoperative sinusitis (P =.001) and sinuses with thick mucosa (P <.0001) were statistically significant factors correlated with late signs and symptoms of sinusitis. There was a slight correlation between chronic sinusitis and women (P =.079) or 2-stage procedures (P =.098). There was no statistical correlation to intraoperative complications, such as membrane perforation and excessive bleeding. Conclusions: The occurrence of postoperative chronic sinusitis appears to be limited to patients with history of preoperative sinusitis and sinuses with thick mucosa, despite control of the disease before sinus augmentation. Intraoperative surgical complications have negligible effect. Patients presenting with preoperative sinusitis and sinuses with thick mucosa need to be informed of the increased risk. They require a close follow-up and prompt treatment in the event of signs and symptoms of sinusitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1-e4
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology
Volume110
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Late signs and symptoms of maxillary sinusitis after sinus augmentation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this