Kindergarten programming goes mobile - Should the next years be about ubiquity?

Ruthi Aladjem, Asi Kuperman, David Mioduser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Over the past 50 years, since the introduction of the programmable floor turtle, the dyad learning/programming environment underwent several transformations. Each transformation brought about new questions regarding children's understanding, learning and programming performance. This paper describes results from a preliminary study analyzing the current transformation from desktop to mobile-based learning/programming by kindergarten children. Observations of children's performance and semi structured interviews with teachers were conducted. The findings unveiled three key themes, namely, changes in programmers' perspectives, changes in foci and learning patterns in different programming modes, and changes in patterns of collaboration among peers. The preliminary findings serve as basis for planning further systematic research on the design of mobile-based programming environments for kindergarten children.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIDC 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages304-309
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450349215
DOIs
StatePublished - 27 Jun 2017
Event16th International ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2017 - Stanford, United States
Duration: 27 Jun 201730 Jun 2017

Publication series

NameIDC 2017 - Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children

Conference

Conference16th International ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children, IDC 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityStanford
Period27/06/1730/06/17

Keywords

  • Educational robotics
  • Mobile programming environment
  • Young children

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