Juvenile primary Fibromyalgia Syndrome: epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and diagnosis

Maya Levy Coles, Rotem Weissmann, Yosef Uziel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) is a chronic, musculoskeletal pain syndrome affecting children and adolescents, most commonly adolescent girls. The syndrome has a multifactorial etiology, with altered central pain processing playing an important role. The hallmark symptom is severe, widespread musculoskeletal pain. Other symptoms include sleep and mood disturbances, headaches, stiffness, and subjective joint swelling. Physical examination can reveal multiple tender points. The diagnosis is clinical, with defined criteria. Early diagnosis and intervention are important. In this part of the review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of JPFS. Part two will focus on treatment and prognosis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number22
JournalPediatric Rheumatology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Fibromyalgia
  • JPFS
  • Juvenile
  • Musculoskeletal pain syndrome

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