Israeli Adolescents’ Perceptions of the Costs of the Transition to an Egalitarian Gender Role Allocation

Orit Ichilov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examines how Israeli eleventh and twelfth graders perceive the costs of one pattern of gender role allocation: allowing women to combine gainful employment with domestic responsibilities, and greater assistance of men in the household. This pattern has become fairly common in recent years, and symbolizes for many people the essence of gender egalitarianism. An exchange model which is designed to explain males' and females’ evaluations of costs was theoretically developed and empirically tested. The costs included physical costs fatigue), psychological costs (stress, self image), and social costs (status) to both males and females, as well as economic costs to the family, and non-economic costs related to child rearing and household maintenance (neglect, for example). The data revealed that all respondents viewed this pattern as costly, especially for women. However males rated each cost higher than females. They rated the physical, psychological, and the social costs for females higher than any of the costs for men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-318
Number of pages12
JournalGender and Education
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Israeli Adolescents’ Perceptions of the Costs of the Transition to an Egalitarian Gender Role Allocation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this