Israel: The New Immigration to Israel: Becoming a De Facto Immigration State in the 1990s

Rebeca Raijman*, Adriana Kemp

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter provides a general portrait of new migration trends to Israel and the general characteristics of the migrants themselves. The general overview is organized along two major axes that characterize migration flows to Israel since the end of the 1980s: Jewish migration under the law of return and non-Jewish and non-Palestinian flows of labor migrants. In the conclusion we expand on several challenges that have emerged within the Israeli context of immigration during the last decades: (1) migration from the former Soviet Union; (2) migration from Ethiopia; (3) non-Jewish migration under the auspices of the law of return; and (4) non-Jewish labor migrants. These challenges are likely to leave their imprint on Israel's regime of incorporation and society.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationImmigration Worldwide
Subtitle of host publicationPolicies, Practices, and Trends
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199863440
ISBN (Print)9780195388138
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Israel
  • Jewish migration
  • Labor migration
  • Migrants' incorporation
  • Non-Jewish migrants

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