Is that a "no"? The interpretation of responses to unwanted sexual attention

Dana Yagil*, Orit Karnieli-Miller, Zvi Eisikovits, Guy Enosh

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we used an interactive perspective to address the issue of responses to sexual harassment. We examined the effect of the consistency across time, consistency across types of advances, and assertiveness of a rejecting response on its perceived effectiveness. Participants were presented with scenarios that described responses to unwanted sexual attention and were required to rate the effectiveness of the responses for their clarity, content, and estimated effect on the future behavior of the perpetrator. The results show significant effects of consistency across time, consistency across types of advances, and assertiveness on perceived effectiveness of the response. As expected, an assertive response that was consistent across time and types of advances was perceived to be the most effective. This effect was found to be stronger for women than for men.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-260
Number of pages10
JournalSex Roles
Volume54
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attribution
  • Responses
  • Sexual harassment

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