Is Pyroglutamic Acid a Prognostic Factor Among Patients with Suspected Infection? A Prospective Cohort Study

Itai Gueta, Yarden Perach Ovadia, Noa Markovits, Yehoshua N. Schacham, Avi Epsztein, Ronen Loebstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pyroglutamic acid (PGA) is a compound that accumulates during oxidative stress and hence, elevated levels may be associated with poor prognosis in patients with infection or sepsis. To examine this hypothesis, patients presenting with acute infection were recruited in the emergency department and prospectively followed for 30 days. Sport urine samples were quantified for PGA. Outcomes were mortality and composite outcome of death or organ failure. Thirty two (32%) patients had qSOFA≥2. Median urine PGA was 22.9 (IQR 17.64, 33.53) µmol/mmol creatinine. Four patients demonstrated PGA values ≥ 63 µmol/mmol creatinine. Univariate analysis showed that PGA concentration ≥ 75th percentile (i.e. 33.53 µmol/mmol creatinine) was associated with higher rates of in-hospital mortality (p = 0.041) with similar trend for PGA ≥ 63 µmol/mmol creatinine (p = 0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed that PGA was not associated with worse outcomes, whereas heart rate was associated with both composite outcomes (HR 1.0, p = 0.008 and HR 1.02, p = 0.001 for composite outcome with 30 days and in-hospital mortality, respectively). Among low risk patients, high PGA levels were consistently associated with worse outcomes. In conclusion, urine PGA concentration was not associated with worse outcomes among septic patients. Nevertheless, future studies should evaluate this association in larger cohorts.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10128
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

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