Is increased body mass index associated with a cardioprotective effect after ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction?

Zaza Iakobishvili, Vladimir Danicek, Avital Porter, Abid Assali, Alexander Battler, David Hasdai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent studies highlighted the 'obesity paradox' after revascularization, suggesting a 'cardioprotective' effect of obesity. We assessed the association of BMI and regional wall motion score (RWMS) and peak CK and cTnI values (markers of infarct size) and 30-day survival among consecutive first ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction patients who underwent successful primary PCI. Of the 164 patients, we found no difference in infarct size among the different groups, BMI≤25kg/m 2 , 25 30 kg/m 2 , and no association between BMI as continuous variable and these variables. Thirty-day death rates were not statistically different among the three groups (10, 5, 2%, respectively, P = 0.83). Increased BMI does not confer any protective effect on the heart during acute ischemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-98
Number of pages4
JournalAcute Cardiac Care
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2006

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Echocardiography
  • Infarct size
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Obesity

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