Investigation of the mechanism of soft tissue conduction explains several perplexing auditory phenomena

Cahtia Adelman*, Shai Chordekar, Ronen Perez, Haim Sohmer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Soft tissue conduction (STC) is a recently expounded mode of auditory stimulation in which the clinical bone vibrator delivers auditory frequency vibratory stimuli to skin sites on the head, neck, and thorax. Investigation of the mechanism of STC stimulation has served as a platform for the elucidation of the mechanics of cochlear activation, in general, and to a better understanding of several perplexing auditory phenomena. This review demonstrates that it is likely that the cochlear hair cells can be directly activated at low sound intensities by the fluid pressures initiated in the cochlea; that the fetus in utero, completely enveloped in amniotic fluid, hears by STC; that a speaker hears his/her own voice by air conduction and by STC; and that pulsatile tinnitus is likely due to pulsatile turbulent blood flow producing fluid pressures that reach the cochlea through the soft tissues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-272
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Activation
  • Cochlea
  • Fetus
  • Fluid pressures
  • Hearing
  • In utero
  • Pulsatile
  • Soft tissue
  • Tinnitus
  • Voice

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