Introduction: Conflicts and Social Psychology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

Abstract

Conflicts are defined as situations in which two or more parties perceive that their goals and/or interests are in direct contradiction with one another and decide to act on the basis of this perception. This definition suggests two conditions for eruption of the conflict: identification of the contradiction and the decision to act on this basis. Accordingly, it is not enough that each of the parties will identify the contradiction in goals and/or interests: In order for a conflict to erupt, it is necessary that at least one party will decide to act upon this contradiction and bring it into the light, at least in a verbal expression. This means that conflicts may erupt also when in the first stage only one side perceives that its goals and/or interests are in direct contradiction with the goals or interests of another party and decides to act on the basis of this perception. Such a move causes the other side to note the contradiction and act as well, leading to the surge of the conflict.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIntergroup Conflicts and Their Resolution
Subtitle of host publicationA Social Psychological Perspective
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages1-38
Number of pages38
ISBN (Electronic)9781136847905
ISBN (Print)9781841697833
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2011

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