Intracerebroventricular transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells induced to secrete neurotrophic factors attenuates clinical symptoms in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis

Yael Barhum, Sharon Gai-Castro, Merav Bahat-Stromza, Ran Barzilay, Eldad Melamed, Daniel Offen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stem cell-based therapy holds great potential for future treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were previously reported to ameliorate symptoms in mouse MS models (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE). In this study, we induced MSCs to differentiate in vitro into neurotrophic factor-producing cells (NTFCs). Our main goal was to examine the clinical use of NTFCs on EAE symptoms. The NTFCs and MSCs were transplanted intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to EAE mice. We found that NTFCs transplantations resulted in a delay of symptom onset and increased animal survival. Transplantation of MSCs also exerted a positive effect but to a lesser extent. In vitro analysis demonstrated the NTFCs' capacity to suppress mice immune cells and protect neuronal cells from oxidative insult. Our results indicate that NTFCs-transplanted ICV delay disease symptoms of EAE mice, possibly via neuroprotection and immunomodulation, and may serve as a possible treatment to MS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-137
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Molecular Neuroscience
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Keywords

  • Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)
  • Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)

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