Intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery is not significantly higher in crohn's disease patients compared to healthy population

Efrat Broide, Andrei Schopan, Michael Zaretsky, Nimrod Alain Kimchi, Michael Shapiro, Eitan Scapa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patients with Crohn's disease might have accelerated atherosclerosis due to: chronic systemic inflammation, metabolic changes or prolonged steroid treatment. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the risk of sub-clinical atherosclerosis in Crohn's disease, by measuring the intima-media thickness and peak systolic velocity of the common carotid artery. Methods: Fifty Crohn's disease patients aged between 20 and 45 years were compared to 25 controls. Patients with a family history of cardiovascular diseases or a known risk for atherosclerosis were excluded. All participants underwent nutritional assessment. Carotid artery ultrasonography was performed and intima-media thickness and peak systolic velocity were measured, proximal to the common carotid bifurcation. Clinical data and laboratory parameters (hemoglobin, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, and plasma homocysteine) were determined. Results: No significant differences between the groups were found for intima-media thickness or peak systolic velocity. Multiple regression analysis revealed a positive correlation of intima-media thickness with older age. Peak systolic velocity was negatively associated with age. Conclusions: Crohn's disease patients do not have an increased risk for developing early atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-202
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Crohn's disease
  • Intima-media thickness
  • Peak systolic velocity

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