Intergroup helping as status relations: Effects of status stability, identification, and type of help on receptivity to high-status group's help

Arie Nadler*, Samer Halabi

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Integrating research on social identity processes and helping relations, the authors proposed that low-status group members who are high identifiers will be unwilling to receive help from the high-status group when status relations are perceived as unstable and help is dependency-oriented. The first experiment, a minimal group experiment, found negative reactions to help from a high-status outgroup when status relations were unstable. The 2nd and 3rd experiments, which used real groups of Israeli Arabs and Israeli Jews, replicated this finding and showed that high identifiers were less receptive to help from the high-status outgroup than low identifiers. The 4th experiment, a help-seeking experiment with real groups of competing high schools, found that the least amount of help was sought from a high-status group by high identifiers when status relations were perceived as unstable and help was dependency-oriented. Theoretical and applied implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Keywords

  • Dependency-/autonomy-oriented help
  • Help-seeking
  • Ingroup identification
  • Perceived status stability
  • Reactions to help

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