Injuries from civilian under-vehicle improvised explosive devices: an analysis of the Israeli National Trauma Registry during the years 2006–2020

Israeli Trauma Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Under-vehicle explosions caused by improvised explosive devices (IED) came to the public’s attention during armed conflicts. However, IEDs are also used by criminals in the civilian setting. This study aimed to determine the pattern of injury, medical management, and outcomes of civilians injured during under-vehicle explosions caused by IEDs. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study based on the Israeli National Trauma Registry of patients injured from under vehicle explosions caused by IEDs during 2006–2020. Injuries resulting from terror attacks and war were excluded. Descriptive statistics were used for data analysis. Results: During the study period, 58 incidents were recorded, resulting in 74 patients who arrived alive to the hospitals and 17 who died on scene. Seventy-one (95.9%) were male with a median age of 32 years (IQR 24–42). 42% were severely injured (ISS ≥ 16). There was an average of 2.4 injured regions per patient, with extremity injuries being the most common (70.3%). Face (34%), abdomen (28%), and chest (22%) injuries were frequent. 45% were immediately transferred to the operating theatre, and 72% underwent at least one operation. Orthopedic surgeries were the most common interventions. 27 amputations were performed. Conclusions: Injuries caused by under-vehicle IEDs in civilian settings differ from those caused by IEDs used during military conflicts or acts of terrorism: they are associated with fewer victims per incident, more severe injuries, more truncal injuries, and more lower extremity injuries requiring amputations. This can be attributed to the lack of personal and vehicle protection, and the different explosive types.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Blast injury
  • Civilian trauma
  • Crime
  • Improvised explosive device
  • Interpersonal violence

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