Inhibition of lymphokine-activated killer cells generation in vitro by soluble factors released from mixed human tumor and peripheral blood mononuclear adherent cells culture

Avi Eisenthal, Elena Barbarsteyn, Gilad Gitstein, Beatriz Lifschitz-Mercer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: A variety of molecules produced by both tumor cells and normal cells reduce the activity of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. We tested the possible cross-regulation of mel-624 melanoma cells and adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in affecting LAK cell activity. Methods: PBMC adherent cells were cultured together with mel-624 melanoma cells. Supernatant was transferred to a 4-day LAK cells generation culture consisted of PBMC nonadherent cells and interleukin-2. LAK cytotoxic activity was tested in a 4-hour assay against Daudi tumor cells p relabeled with sodium 51chromate. Results: The supernatant produced within the first 48 hours of mixed mel-624 melanoma cell and adherent PBMC culture substantially (by 69 percent) reduced the generation of LAK cells, whereas the supernatant from either tumor culture or adherent PBMC culture had no effect. The inhibitory effect was manifested on the generation of LAK cells when autologous nonadherent cells were cultured with 1,000 units/ml IL-2, but there was no effect on mature LAK cell cytotoxic activity. Inhibition of LAK cell generation was partially dependent on protein synthesis and was not mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). Conclusion: Our results point toward the production of soluble, yet unidentified proteins, in mixed tumor-adherent PBMC cultures, which substantially reduced the induction of LAK cells in culture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-34
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Investigation
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Cytotoxicity
  • Inhibition
  • LAK cells
  • Melanoma
  • TGF-beta

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