[Influenza vaccination of pediatric staff as a predictor for recommendations to children].

Zachi Grossman, Matitiahu Berkovitch, Rony Braunstein, Herman A. Cohen, Dan Mirons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

As of February 2010, the 2009 H1N1 influenza has caused more than 15,000 deaths worldwide. Seasonal influenza vaccination rates among health care workers (HCW) have been universally low; the 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination of HCW has also been disappointing. In several studies, a correlation between HCW seasonal influenza vaccination status and vaccine recommendation to adult patients was found. To examine the correlation between the declared influenza vaccination status of pediatric staff and vaccine recommendations to their patients. Instrument: Anonymous questionnaire concerning attitudes and practices regarding seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccination. Respondents: 141 pediatric staff attending a conference. Seventy two percent of the respondents had been or intended to be vaccinated against seasonal influenza, 62% against the 2009 H1N1 influenza, and 56% against both diseases. Ambulatory setting employment was positively associated with the recommendation of seasonal influenza vaccination to all children. By multivariate Logistic regression analysis, the "vaccinated or intending to be vaccinated against seasonal influenza" was the only significant independent variable associated with recommending universal pediatric seasonal influenza vaccine (OR=15, 95% CI 6.1-41.4, p < 0.001). Similarly, "being or intending to be vaccinated against the 2009 H1N1 influenza" was the only significant independent variable associated with recommending universal pediatric vaccination against this disease (OR = 5.2, 95% CI 1.85-14.6, P = 0.002). A strong correlation between the influenza vaccination status of pediatric staff and the recommendation of the vaccines to children emphasizes that intense education of providers is a crucial step in assuring a positive recommendation to families.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)342-345, 378
JournalHarefuah
Volume151
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '[Influenza vaccination of pediatric staff as a predictor for recommendations to children].'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this