Influence of static and dynamic disorder on the visible and infrared absorption spectra of carbonmonoxy horseradish peroxidase

Andras D. Kaposi, Jane M. Vanderkooi, Wayne W. Wright, Judit Fidy, Solomon S. Stavrov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Spectroscopy of horseradish peroxidase with and without the substrate analog, benzohydroxamic acid, was monitored in a glycerol/water solvent as a function of temperature. It was determined from the water infrared (IR) absorption that the solvent has a glass transition at 170-180 K. In the absence of substrate, both the heme optical Q(0,0) absorption band and the IR absorption band of CO bound to heme broaden markedly upon heating from 10-300 K. The Q(0,0) band broadens smoothly in the whole temperature interval, whereas the IR bandwidth is constant in the glassy matrix and increases from 7 to 16 cm-1 upon heating above the glass transition. Binding of substrate strongly diminishes temperature broadening of both the bands. The results are consistent with the view that the substrate strongly reduces the amplitude of motions of amino acids forming the heme pocket. The main contribution to the Q(0,0) bandwidth arises from the heme vibrations that are not affected by the phase transition. The CO band thermal broadening stems from the anharmonic coupling with motions of the heme environment, which, in the glassy state, are frozen in. Unusually strong temperature broadening of the CO band is interpreted to be caused by thermal population of a very flexible excited conformational substrate. Analysis of literature data on the thermal broadening of the A0 band of Mb(CO) (Ansari et al., 1987. Biophys. Chem. 26:337-355) shows that such a state presents itself also in myoglobin.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3472-3482
Number of pages11
JournalBiophysical Journal
Volume81
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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