Influence of a merger on nurses' emotional well-being: The importance of self-efficacy and emotional reactivity

Menucha Idel, Shmuel Melamed, Paul Merlob, Jacob Yahav, Tova Hendel, Boris Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The influence of the merger of two major medical centres on the emotional well-being of nurses was investigated by use of a questionnaire on emotional distress, perception of threat, self-efficacy and emotional reactivity. Evaluations were carried out 1 month prior to the merger at the official announcement, and again half a year after the merger took place. Before the merger, threat perception was higher in the transferring nurses, but the difference was of borderline significance (P = 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between threat perception and both emotional reactivity and emotional distress, and a significant negative correlation between self-efficacy and both threat perception and emotional distress (P < 0.001 for all). After the merger, the transferring nurses showed more emotional distress (P = 0.009). There was a significant positive correlation between threat perception, emotional distress and negative outcome variables such as burnout and stress (P < 0.001), and a significant negative correlation between threat perception and positive outcome variables such as growth (P < 0.01).This study identifies some personal characteristics that can affect the way nurses deal with hospital mergers and need to be considered during organizational changes in order to maintain job satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-63
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nursing Management
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2003

Keywords

  • Emotional reactivity
  • Merger
  • Nurses
  • Self-efficacy

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