Induced bacterial sickness causes inflammation but not blood oxidative stress in Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus)

David Costantini, Maya Weinberg, Lilla Jordán, Kelsey R. Moreno, Yossi Yovel, Gábor Czirják

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bats are particularly interesting vertebrates in their response to pathogens owing to extremes in terms of tolerance and resistance. Oxidation is often a by-product of processes involved in the acute phase response, which may result in antimicrobial or self-damaging effects. We measured the immunological and oxidative status responses of Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus) to a simulated bacterial infection using lipopolysaccharide injection. As expected, experimental bats exhibited increases in two humoral immunological markers. However, they surprisingly did not show any effects across two markers of oxidative damage and four antioxidant markers. We propose that this lack of effects on oxidative status may be due to a reduction in cell metabolism through sickness behaviours or given life history traits, such as a long lifespan and a frugivorous diet. Finally, the consistency in the pattern of elevation in haptoglobin and lysozyme between current and previous findings highlights their utility as diagnostic markers for extracellular infections in bats.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbercoac028
JournalConservation Physiology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • antioxidant
  • bats
  • ecoimmunology
  • extracellular pathogen
  • infection
  • inflammation
  • innate immunity
  • oxidative stress

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