Individual differences in system justification predict power and morality-related needs in advantaged and disadvantaged groups in response to group disparity

Tabea Hässler*, Nurit Shnabel, Johannes Ullrich, Anat Arditti-Vogel, Ilanit SimanTov-Nachlieli

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Guided by the needs-based model, we explored how individual differences in system justification predict group members’ needs in response to information about group-based disparities. Across two studies (N = 819), we found that among disadvantaged-group members (LGBTIQ* individuals/women) system justification was negatively related to need for power. Among advantaged-group members ([cis-]heterosexuals/men), system justification was negatively related to motivation to restore their ingroup’s moral essence (i.e., moral shame and wish that the ingroup would act more morally) but positively related to motivation to restore their ingroup’s moral image (i.e., need for positive moral image and expectation that the outgroup should acknowledge the ingroup’s morality). These results theoretically extend the needs-based model by offering a more nuanced picture of morality-related needs. Further, they underline the importance of considering individual differences in system justification for understanding advantaged- and disadvantaged-group members’ responses to social inequality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)746-766
Number of pages21
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2019

Funding

FundersFunder number
German Israeli Foundation1119-126.412010
Seventh Framework ProgrammePCIG09-GA-2011-293602

    Keywords

    • gender relations
    • needs-based model
    • sexual orientation and gender identity
    • structural inequality
    • system justification

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