Incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 is increased in patients with acute-phase ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with a primary percutaneous coronary intervention: A pilot study

Alex Blatt, Eli Shiloah, Sa'ar Mincha, Olga Bloch, Micha J. Rapoport*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is assumed to have a cardioprotective effect. It is not known whether GLP-1 levels are increased in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We investigated the GLP-1 levels in patients presenting with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Patients and methods: GLP-1 serum level samples were obtained in 12 consecutive patients presenting with acute STEMI before and 24, 72h, and 90 days after a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Results: The mean GLP-1 levels increased significantly within 24h after PCI from 27±7.1 to 39.5±11.4 (P <0.04) and reverted to preadmission levels after 3 months. No correlation was found between GLP-1 levels and any of the clinical and laboratory parameters or indicators of myocardial infarction severity. However, both hypertension and smoking history (former and current) were associated with significantly lower GLP-1 levels as compared with normotensive and nonsmoker patients (P< 0.01 and P<0.04, respectively). Conclusion A transient and significant increase in GLP-1 levels occurs in patients after STEMI treated with primary PCI. These pilot data may suggest a role for GLP-1 in the physiologic response to acute ischemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-102
Number of pages5
JournalCardiovascular Endocrinology
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Keywords

  • Cardioprotection
  • Glucagon-like peptide 1
  • Myocardial infarction

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