Increased risk of snoring and adenotonsillectomy in children referred for tympanostomy tube insertion

Riva Tauman*, Ari DeRowe, Orna Ophir, Michal Greenfeld, Yakov Sivan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Eustachian tube dysfunction and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) share common pathophysiologic mechanisms. Our objective was to investigate whether children referred for isolated TTI (tympanostomy tube insertion) are at increased risk for snoring and upper airway procedures. Methods: Telephone interviews to parents of children who underwent isolated TTI and to age- and gender-matched controls were conducted. Results: Four hundred fifty-seven children were included in the study; 352 had isolated TTI (study group) and 105 children were controls. Twenty-two percent of children in the study group were reported to snore compared with 7.6% in the controls (p = 0.001). Eighteen percent of children in the study group were reported to have undergone adenotonsillectomy compared with 4.8% in the controls (p = 0.0005). Future SDB, i.e., either snoring or adenotonsillectomy following TTI, was found in 34% of children in the study group compared with 11% in the controls (p = 0.0004). Children who underwent isolated TTI were at increased risk for future snoring (OR = 3.4, CI: 1.6-7.2) and future adenotonsillectomy (OR = 4.4, CI: 1.7-11.2). Conclusions: Children who undergo isolated TTI are at increased risk for snoring and for adenotonsillectomy. We suggest that these children be followed for symptoms of SDB on a scheduled basis to allow for early diagnosis and intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-200
Number of pages4
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Keywords

  • Adenoidectomy
  • OM-6
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Sleep-disordered breathing
  • Snoring
  • Tonsillectomy
  • Tympanostomy tube insertion

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