Increased algicidal activity of Aeromonas veronii in response to Microcystis aeruginosa: interspecies crosstalk and secondary metabolites synergism

Gad Weiss, Dimitry Kovalerchick, Judy Lieman-Hurwitz, Omer Murik, Roberto De Philippis, Shmuel Carmeli, Assaf Sukenik, Aaron Kaplan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Toxic Microcystis spp. blooms constitute a serious threat to water quality worldwide. Aeromonas veronii was isolated from Microcystis sp. colonies collected in Lake Kinneret. Spent Aeromonas media inhibits the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa MGK isolated from Lake Kinneret. The inhibition was much stronger when Aeromonas growth medium contained spent media from MGK suggesting that Aeromonas recognized its presence and produced secondary metabolites that inhibit Microcystis growth. Fractionations of the crude extract and analyses of the active fractions identified several secondary metabolites including lumichrome in Aeromonas media. Application of lumichrome at concentrations as low as 4 nM severely inhibited Microcystis growth. Inactivation of aviH in the lumichrome biosynthetic pathway altered the lumichrome level in Aeromonas and the extent of MGK growth inhibition. Conversely, the initial lag in Aeromonas growth was significantly longer when provided with Microcystis spent media but Aeromonas was able to resume normal growth. The longer was pre-exposure to Microcystis spent media the shorter was the lag phase in Aeromonas growth indicating the presence of, and acclimation to, secondary MGK metabolite(s) the nature of which was not revealed. Our study may help to control toxic Microcystis blooms taking advantage of chemical languages used in the interspecies communication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1140-1150
Number of pages11
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Increased algicidal activity of Aeromonas veronii in response to Microcystis aeruginosa: interspecies crosstalk and secondary metabolites synergism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this