Incidence and risk factors for intussusception among children in northern Israel from 1992 to 2009: A retrospective study

Khitam Muhsen*, Eias Kassem, Sigalit Efraim, Sophy Goren, Dani Cohen, Moshe Ephros

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Determining the background incidence of intussusception is important in countries implementing rotavirus immunization. Rotavirus immunization was introduced into the routine infant immunization program in Israel during late 2010. Incidence and risk factors for intussusception were examined in children aged less than five years between 1992 and 2009. Methods: Data were collected from medical records of children hospitalized due to intussusception (N = 190), and from control children (N = 295), at Carmel and Hillel Yaffe hospitals in northern Israel. Results: The average annual incidence of intussusception in Jewish and Arab children aged less than five years was estimated at 36.1 (95% CI 17.0-76.5) vs. 23.2 per 100,000 (95% CI 9.3-57.9); for infants less than 12 months of age- 128.1 (95% CI 53.0-309.6) vs. 80.1 (95% CI 29.1-242.6) per 100,000. The risk of intussusception was higher in infants aged 3-5 months: OR 5.30 (95% CI 2.11-13.31) and 6-11 months: OR 2.53 (95% CI 1.13-5.62) when compared to infants aged less than 3 months; in those living in low vs high socioeconomic communities: OR 2.81 (95% CI 1.45-5.43), and in children with recent gastroenteritis: OR 19.90 (95% CI 2.35-168.32) vs children without recent gastroenteritis. Surgical reduction was required in 23.2%. The likelihood of surgery was significantly increased in patients presenting with bloody stool, in Arabs and those who were admitted to Hillel Yaffe Hospital.Conclusions: The incidence of intussusception prior to universal rotavirus immunization was documented in northern Israel. Despite the lower incidence, Arab patients underwent surgery more often, suggesting delayed hospital admission of Arab as opposed to Jewish patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number218
JournalBMC Pediatrics
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Intussusception
  • Pediatrics
  • Risk factors
  • Surgery

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