Implicit stress theory: An experimental examination of the impact of rater's stress on performance appraisal

Mina Westman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated the effects of manipulated stress and implicit stress theory (IST) on performance appraisal. We conducted a 2 (stressed/ nonstressed participants) ×2 (high-and low-stress job of protagonists) experimental design on a sample of 81 middle-level managers. Managers in the high-stress jobs were rated as more committed and more burned out than managers in the low-stress jobs, as hypothesized. Interactive patterns demonstrated that stressed respondents evaluated the effectiveness of managers in the high-stress jobs as lower than that of the managers in the low-stress jobs. Nonstressed respondents evaluated the effectiveness of managers in the high-stress jobs as higher than that of managers in the low-stress jobs. Negative affectivity had no impact on reported stress and performance appraisal.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-766
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Social Behavior and Personality
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996

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