Impact of low level laser irradiation on infarct size in the rat following myocardial infarction

N. Ad, U. Oron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Low energy level irradiation (LLLI) has been found to modulate biological processes. The effect of LLLI on the development of acute myocardial infarction (MI) was investigated following chronic ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery in laboratory rats. The hearts of 22 rats were laser irradiated (LI) using a diode laser (804 nm, 38 mW power output) through the intercostal muscles in the chest following MI and on day 3 post MI. In the control non laser irradiated (NLI) group (19 rats) MI was induced experimentally and laser irradiation was not applied. All rats were sacrificed 21 days post MI. Size, thickness and relative circumferential length of the infarct, as well as other parameters, were determined from histological sections stained with Masson's trichrome and hearts stained with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) using histomorphometric methods. The infarct size (expressed as percent of total left ventricle area) of the LI rats was 10.1±5.8, which was significantly lower (65%; P<0.01) than the infarct size of NLI rats which was 28.7±9.6. Correlatively, the ratio of circumferential length of the infarcted area was significantly lower (2-fold; P<0.01) in the LI rats as compared to the NLI rats. LLLI of the infarcted area in the myocardium of experimentally induced MI rats, at the correct energy, duration and timing, markedly reduces the loss of myocardial tissue. This phenomenon may have an important beneficial effect on patients after acute MI or ischemic heart disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-116
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume80
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Ischemia
  • Low energy lasers
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Rat

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