Impact of Drug and Alcohol Use on Hospitalization for Injuries in Riders of Electric Bikes or Powered Scooters: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study

Yafit Hamzani, Helena Demtriou, Adi Zelnik, Nir Cohen, Michael J. Drescher, Gavriel Chaushu, Bahaa Haj Yahya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The growing popularity of E-bikes and P-scooters has led to their increasing involvement in injuries. This study sought to evaluate the impact of drug and alcohol consumption on hospitalization rates for electric-vehicle-associated injuries. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was used, including patients evacuated to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary medical center in 2014–2020 for injuries sustained while riding E-bikes or P-scooters. Data on clinical characteristics were collected from the medical files, including pre-accident usage of alcohol or drugs. Of the 1234 patients (75.7% male) who met the inclusion criteria, 90 (7.3%) were hospitalized. The mean (SD) number of admission days was 5.44 (±0.12). Alcohol consumption was associated with 2.2% of injuries and drug use with 0.6%. Patients who rode under the influence of alcohol were significantly more likely to be hospitalized than discharged (6.7% vs. 1.8%, χ2 (2) =19.25, p < 0.001); the odds ratio was 14.1. A similar association with hospitalization was found for drug use (χ2 (2) = 7.83, p = 0.02). Riding an E-bike or P-scooter under the influence of alcohol or drugs increases the probability of severe injury requiring hospital admission. These results should prompt the relevant authorities to initiate effective legislation of alcohol and drug use.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1026
JournalHealthcare (Switzerland)
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • drugs
  • electric bikes
  • emergency department
  • injury
  • powered scooters

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