Immediate and long-term prognostic significance of a first anterior versus first inferior wall Q-wave acute myocardial infarction

Solomon Behar, Babeth Rabinowitz, Monty Zion, Henrietta Reicher-Reiss, Elieser Kaplinsky, Edward Abinader, Jacob Agmon, Yaacov Friedman, Yehezkiel Kishon, Abraham Palant, Benyamin Peled, Leonardo Reisin, Zwi Schlesinger, Izhar Zahavi, Uri Goldbourt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Of 3,981 patients with a first Q-wave acute myocardial infarction (AMI), 1,929 (48%) had an anterior and 1,724 (43%) an inferior wall AMI. These 2 groups were well-matched with respect to age, gender and relevant history. The in-hospital mortality rate was 18%, and the 1- and 5-year postdischarge mortality rates were 9 and 25%, respectively, in patients with anterior wall AMI compared with the corresponding rates of 11, 6 and 19% in those with inferior wall AMI (p < 0.0001 for each category). The frequency of recurrent nonfatal AMI in the year after the index AMI was 8% in the patients with anterior wall AMI compared with 4% in those with inferior wall AMI (p < 0.0001). By multiple logistic regression analysis of events, anterior wall AMI was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality only. The findings indicate that the anatomic location of a Q-wave AMI influences immediate and short-term survival of patients with a first Q-wave AMI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1366-1370
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume72
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Dec 1993
Externally publishedYes

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