Hypodontia of Permanent Teeth among Middle Palaeolithic Hominids: An Early Case Dated to ca. 92 000 ± 5000 Years BP at the Qafzeh Site

Anne Marie Tillier, Israel Kaffe, Baruch Arensburg, Mario Chech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The analysis of the maxillae and mandible belonging to a Middle Palaeolithic child has provided evidence of the early appearance of a developmental dental anomaly among Homo sapiens. The material came from the Near Eastern site of Qafzeh. In the mandible there was agenesis of the left second premolar and congenital absence of the right could not be totally excluded. Additional analyses including two presumed cases of dental development anomalies within contemporaneous prehistoric populations showed that tooth agenesis also can affect the anterior region of the mandible, and could be clearly separated from ante-mortem tooth loss caused by trauma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Osteoarchaeology
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Mandible
  • Middle palaeolithic
  • Premolar
  • Tooth agenesis

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