Human/BALB radiation chimera engrafted with splenocytes from patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura produce human platelet antibodies

B. Dekel, H. Marcus, B. Shenkman, A. Shimoni, Y. Shechter, A. Canaan, A. Berrebi, D. Varon, Y. Reisner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We have previously shown that lethally irradiated normal strains of mice, radioprotected with severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) bone marrow, can be engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The human/mouse radiation chimera can mount marked humoral and cellular responses to recall antigens, as well as primary responses. In the present study, we adoptively transferred splenocytes from patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) into lethally irradiated BALB/c mice, radioprotected with SCID bone marrow. High titres of total human immunoglobulin appeared as early as 2 weeks post-transplant and declined after 6 weeks, while human anti-human platelet antibodies were detected 2-8 weeks after the transfer of splenocytes. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction contained antibodies against glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (CD41) or GPIb/IX (CD42). The human platelet antibodies showed a low level of cross-reactivity with mouse platelets, and thrombocytopenia in the animals was not observed. Splenocytes from individual ITP patients differed in their capacity to produce either human platelet antibodies or total human immunoglobulin. Furthermore, antibodies produced in the murine system were not always identical to the original antibodies present in the serum of the patients. The study of the serological aspects of autoantibodies against human platelets in an animal model might be useful for the investigation of potential therapeutics in ITP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-416
Number of pages7
JournalImmunology
Volume94
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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