HPV16 E6 natural variants exhibit different activities in functional assays relevant to the carcinogenic potential of E6

Hava Lichtig, Meirav Algrisi, Liat Edri Botzer, Tal Abadi, Yulia Verbitzky, Anna Jackman, Massimo Tommasino, Ingeborg Zehbe, Levana Sherman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Genetic studies have revealed natural amino acid variations within the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 E6 oncoprotein. To address the functional significance of E6 polymorphisms, 10 HPV16 E6 variants isolated from cervical lesions of Swedish women were evaluated for their activities in different in vitro and in vivo assays relevant to the carcinogenic potential of E6. Small differences between E6 prototype and variants, and among variants, were observed in transient expression assays that assessed p53 degradation, Bax degradation, and inhibition of p53 transactivation. More variable levels of activities were exhibited by the E6 proteins in assays that evaluated binding to the E6-binding protein (E6BP) or the human discs large protein (hDlg). The E6 prototype expressed moderate to high activity in the above assays. The L83V polymorphism, previously associated with risk for cancer progression in some populations, expressed similar levels of activity as that of the E6 prototype in most functional assays. On the other hand, L83V displayed more efficient degradation of Bax and binding to E6BP, but lower binding to hDlg. Results of this study indicate that naturally occurring amino acid variations in HPV16 E6 can alter activities of the protein important for its carcinogenic potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-227
Number of pages12
JournalVirology
Volume350
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Bax
  • E6 protein functions
  • E6BP
  • HPV 16 E6 variants
  • HPV polymorphism
  • hDLG
  • p53Arg/Pro

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