How Much TCAM do we Need for Splitting Traffic?

Yaniv Sadeh, Ori Rottenstreich, Haim Kaplan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Traffic splitting is a required functionality in networks, for example for load balancing over paths or servers or by the source's access restrictions. The capacities of the servers (or the number of users with particular access restrictions) determine the sizes of the parts into which traffic should be split. A recent approach implements traffic splitting within the ternary content addressable memory (TCAM), which is often available in switches. It is important to reduce the amount of memory allocated for this task since TCAMs are power consuming and are often also required for other tasks such as classification and routing. Recent works suggested algorithms to compute a smallest implementation of a given partition in the longest prefix match (LPM) model. In this paper we analyze properties of such minimal representations and prove lower and upper bounds on their size. The upper bounds hold for general TCAMs, and we also prove an additional lower-bound for general TCAMs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSOSR 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM SIGCOMM Symposium on SDN Research
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages169-175
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450390842
DOIs
StatePublished - 11 Oct 2021
Event2021 ACM SIGCOMM Symposium on SDN Research, SOSR 2021 - Virtual, Online, United States
Duration: 20 Sep 202121 Sep 2021

Publication series

NameSOSR 2021 - Proceedings of the 2021 ACM SIGCOMM Symposium on SDN Research

Conference

Conference2021 ACM SIGCOMM Symposium on SDN Research, SOSR 2021
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityVirtual, Online
Period20/09/2121/09/21

Keywords

  • TCAM
  • load balancing
  • packet processing
  • traffic splitting

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