How can physicians and their patients with ALS decide to use the newly-available treatments to slow disease progression?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The 1990s decade has seen the testing of treatments to slow disease progression in patients with ALS. Two such treatments (riluzole and myotrophin) have shown minimal or modest efficacy. Of these, riluzole has been approved for marketing in the United States, in Europe and in other countries. Patients and physicians who are trying to decide whether to use these treatments require background information: (a) to place these treatments in the context of other treatments; (b) to understand the outcome measures used; and (c) to understand the significance of the efficacy these treatments have shown. For example, in some cases treatment efficacy has been shown by some measures, but not others. This paper attempts to assist in this process. In addition, we attempt to show how to integrate objective data with relative or subjective factors, such as patient values, economic considerations, and the role of hope.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-14
Number of pages12
JournalAmyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Other Motor Neuron Disorders
Volume1
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Measures of disease progression
  • Outcome measures
  • Quality of life
  • Treatment

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