How are psychotic symptoms and treatment factors affected by religion? A cross-sectional study about religious coping among ultra-Orthodox Jews

David R. Serfaty, Aaron D. Cherniak, Rael D. Strous

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Religious coping is prevalent among individuals diagnosed with psychotic disorders, however its clinical relevance has been insufficiently studied. Thirty ultra-Orthodox Jewish patients experiencing current psychotic symptoms and receiving treatment in the inpatient and day-care units were administered measures assessing severity of psychotic symptoms, psychological distress/well-being, beliefs about treatment credibility/expectancy, and aspects of religious belief and coping. Among men, negative religious coping was associated with lower treatment credibility. Among women, positive religious coping was associated with increased treatment expectancy and greater quality of life; and trust in God was associated with reduced psychiatric symptoms and greater treatment expectancy. Study findings indicate that religious factors may promote treatment motivation and engagement, crucial factors for subpopulations facing culturally-based barriers to treatment, as well as boost more favorable outcomes. Sensitivity to religious factors in treatment appears to play an important role in the management of psychotic disorders and should be engaged when culturally appropriate in order to maximize treatment potential.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113349
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume293
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural
  • Inpatient care
  • Mental health
  • Psychiatry
  • Quality of life
  • Suicidality

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