House dust mites on skin, clothes, and bedding of atopic dermatitis patients

Valery Teplitsky, Kosta Y. Mumcuoglu*, Ilan Babai, Ilan Dalal, Rifka Cohen, Amir Tanaay

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Atopic dermatitis is a common allergic condition in children, often associated with a positive skin reaction to house dust mite allergens. Aim: To determine the presence of house dust mites on the skin, clothes, and bedding of patients with atopic dermatitis. Methods: Nineteen patients with atopic dermatitis were examined during a 2-year period. Samples from affected and healthy skin surfaces were obtained with adhesive tape, and dust samples from bedding and clothes were collected with a vacuum cleaner at the start of the study and 3-6 weeks later, and examined for the presence of house dust mites. The findings were compared with those of 21 healthy controls. Results: The most common mite species on skin were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and Dermatophagoides farinae, which were found in nine patients and three controls. The patient group showed a significantly larger percentage of samples with mites than did the control group (34.9% and 7.9%, respectively) (P < 0.001), and a significantly larger percentage of individuals with at least one positive sample (84.2% and 14.2%, respectively) (P < 0.0001). No correlation was found between the number of mites on the skin and clothes/bedding of patients, or between patients and controls with regard to the number of mites on the clothes and bedding. Conclusions: Patients with atopic dermatitis showed a higher prevalence of mites on their skin than did healthy individuals, which could be involved in allergic sensitization and disease exacerbation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)790-795
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Dermatology
Volume47
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008
Externally publishedYes

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