Hostility and hearing protection behavior: the mediating role of personal beliefs and low frustration tolerance.

S. Rabinowitz*, S. Melamed, M. Feiner, E. Weisberg, J. Ribak

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors examined whether hostility would negatively be associated with occupational health behavior, namely, the use of hearing protection devices (HPDs). Also examined as possible mediators were the protection motivation theory (PMT) components and low frustration tolerance (LFT). Participants were 226 male industrial workers, all exposed to potentially hearing-damaging noise. Hostility was negatively related to HPD use. It moderately correlated with the PMT components: negatively with perceived susceptibility, severity, effectiveness, and self-efficacy and positively with perceived barriers. Hostility correlated highly with LFT. Regression analyses confirmed the mediating role of perceived barriers, low self-efficacy, and LFT in the negative relationship between hostility and the use of HPDs. Thus, intrapsychic characteristics of hostile people may be significant for hearing protection behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)375-381
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational Health Psychology
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Hostility and hearing protection behavior: the mediating role of personal beliefs and low frustration tolerance.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this